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WORM HUMUS IN CANNABIS SUBSTRATE FOR GROWTH STAGE

Earthworms are an essential part of soil life and the biological processes in it; these striped worms eat alive and dead organic material, and have been living in the Earth for millions of years.

The influence of earthworms in vegetal kingdom is very important; their food and droppings generate a soil rich in nutrients and minerals, essential for the proper development of the plants, that is, they decompose the soil organic material through their digestive system, and they generate humus full of bacteria, protozoa and nematodes, revitalizing the soil and stimulating the vegetal development: an ecological, organic, natural way to provide the adequate substrate and nutrients your plants need.

Next, we describe these processes and their pros:

Fertilizer and worm

How does worm humus work?

Humus contains bacteria and protozoa which nourish the soil, providing an adequate environment for the development of the root systems, and reducing the risk of diseases; those bacteria fix nitrogen, transforming it into an easy way for the plants to be assimilated. Besides, the protozoa also release nitrogen, so the strains can properly assimilate the bacteria and fungi.

Those bacteria, collected in worm humus, boost the decomposition of dead organic material; humus symbiotic fungus – mycorrhiza fungus – colonizes the roots of the plants, so the phosphorus becomes soluble, stimulating the growth of the root system and increasing the strength of the strains against diseases and weather inclemencies. Lastly, the nematodes are also important in all this process, eating unwanted bacteria and fungi, and releasing other beneficial ones; all these processes help keep a constant pH level in soil.

How to use it

Worm and Marijuana

Humus is ideal compost, really easy to use – just add it to the substrate and blend it adequately; the plants cannot survive just with humus – when flowering, the plants need other specific composts. Besides, it has to be carefully applied – excess humus could paralyze the crop development: humus quantity is three times smaller than soil – even less.

Lastly, humus is ideal for germination and growth of the plant and the root system – when flowering, other composts are needed.

Benefits

Worm humus pros are multiple and varied, partially mentioned above; anyway, we could summarize them, so you would get to know them properly.

Worm humus nourishes the soil 100% ecologically, avoiding harmful-to-the-environment chemical products, and obtaining plants with minor entropy – molecule disorder – and much tastier buds – guano generates soil rich in nutrients, advanced minerals, protozoa, nematodes, fungi and beneficial bacteria for proper strain development and maximum performance; a cheap, simple way to work on ecological grows.

With this compost, your plants will grow faster, more vigorous and branched, producing a structure which perfectly supports the weight of the huge buds it is going to generate; this is growth compost, so, when flowering, other organic composts are needed – for instance, Bio Bizz range.

Earthworms are an essential part of soil life and the biological processes in it ; these striped worms eat alive and dead organic material, and have been living in the Earth for millions of years. The influence of earthworms in vegetal kingdom is very important; their food and droppings generate a soil rich …

Earthworms in indoor soil?

Hi peeps, new here!

I’m looking into growing organic indoors, which I’ve never done before, only outdoors so far..

So I know earthworms are great for the garden. Great for plants. Mixing EWC in with soil is really good for it and all that..

Outdoors plants have worms living in the soil with no probs. So can I have a good community of worms in indoor grows? Will there be any problems I’m not thinking about? Or is it all good?

Any advice welcome!

LittleDabbie

What would you feed them? Outside they feed on dead and decaying matter.. indoors you would have to supplement that feeding with something else.

Novel idea but in the long run i think you’d just either end up killing the worms with nutes , drowning them from too much water or you’ll end up attracting bugs from supplementing there food source.

organicpanic
GoldiNugs

Cool yeh, well I notice my outdoor plants often have worms in the soil, without me either putting them there or feeding them.

I think they must come out of the ground and enter through the drainage holes..

Anyway they see to live in those pots quite happily and I always see that as a benefit to my plants.

So I was thinking, if outdoors, then why not indoors?

AfricanHaze
VERMONTSKUNKS
WalterWhiteFire
LittleDabbie
WalterWhiteFire
LittleDabbie
WalterWhiteFire

Earthworms Yeah. The ones you find in soil. Too many dabs this morning? Hehe.

I’m not into it, but pretty sure you use red worms for composting.

LittleDabbie

Earthworms Yeah. The ones you find in soil. Too many dabs this morning? Hehe.

I’m not into it, but pretty sure you use red worms for composting.

IF your talking about night crawlers and such they won’t survive the temps of a grow room ( Ive tried them in just a composting bin at room temp and killed 90% of them )

Composting worms aka Red Wigglers would work perfectly they can handle a much broader range of temps.

Other then that theres about 160 specices give or take of earthworms but most prefer cold temps 40’s 50’s sometimes 60’s

Red wigglers can handle excess of 80 – 90F and live longer and eat alot more.

Hi peeps, new here! I'm looking into growing organic indoors, which I've never done before, only outdoors so far.. So I know earthworms are great for the…